How to stop McAfee Total Protection’s start up windows

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in Business, business advice, COO, Marketing

Are you using McAfee Total Protection antivirus software? If so, are you as annoyed as me with a recent “feature” that has the software popping up a window when you launch or logon to your PC? A persistent window that one has to proactively close in order to make it go away?

The program is also popping up windows in the lower right hand portion of the screen prompting you to run a clean-up of your browser or system without telling you exactly what it plans to do. A popup that you need to manually close in order to make it go away. Worse still, there are no checkboxes or buttons in Total Protection’s settings to make it stop.

Am I the only one who thinks this is crossing the line into being malware? I have software causing popups that don’t go away. Software with no settings to make them stop. Utility software that launches its control center on its own, every time I start my computer. I think that’s pretty close to malware.

McAfee Total Protection Logon task

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Do the right things and do things right – Bill Shepard

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in COO

Bill Sheppard of the COO forum was my guest on The Free COO podcast on March 8, 2009. Bill is a seasoned executive and entrepreneur who has created an organization dedicated to the support and growth of COOs. His company the COO Forum has chapters across the US and is growing at a great clip.

In the interview, Bill talks about his highly successful career and how he is now devoting his time to helping entrepreneurs and C-level executives reach their goals.

Hear advice such as a CEO’s role is to guide a company to do the right thing and a COO’s role is to help a company do things right.

The Free COO airs Thursdays at 4:00 pm Pacific Time on Spreaker.com

Hiring Contractors – Part 1

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in COO, Hiring Consultants, Hiring Contractors, HR

Independent Contractors or Independent Consultants are people who do work for your company who are not employees, corporations or LLCs. Hiring independent contractors is attractive to startups because it allows them to quickly bring on talent without the headache of setting up payroll and benefits. Independent contractors also make it easy to bring people onboard for as long or as little as needed without worrying about employment laws that apply to hiring and discharging of regular employees. Without the added expense of benefits, matching FICA payments, and perhaps even office space and equipment, independent contractors can offer real savings and cash flow benefits to a startup organization.

But there are some legal pitfalls to hiring independent contractors that most startups (and many established companies for that matter) don’t understand. This post is the first of a three part series that helps to explain some of those potential pitfalls, so that you can make an informed decision before hiring an independent contractor. Read more…

Justifying Your Pay – An Imperative for the COO and Every Employee

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in COO, HR

If your manager was faced with a force reduction decision, would he or she be able quantify your contribution and justify your position? In other words, does a cost-benefit analysis of your job result in a net positive? Even if it does, have you made the data necessary to prove it readily available?

In a period of high unemployment, outsourcing, cost-cutting and general economic uncertainty every employee needs to be keenly aware of their value to their organization. They should also be able to easily point to solid data that proves their worth. The ability to do this well, could make the difference between you being someone who is indispensable or someone holding a pink slip. If you are not your own best advocate, you should be. Read more…

Setting Up HR – In-House or PEO

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in COO, Getting Started, HR

Human resources encompasses a broad array of business functions. There is the obvious sourcing, hiring and firing of employees. However, retaining employees, training employees, managing benefits, setting compensation policy, overseeing contractors, new hire orientation, managing corporate culture and a host of other functions also fall into the domain or share a dotted line to the HR function.

One of the first questions a startup venture needs to address – at least as soon as the founders hire their first employee or contractor – is who will be responsible for the HR function. Getting this right is critical to the success of a venture, as it is the first five to ten people in an organization that will establish the company’s culture for years to come. Read more…

Setting a Vision

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in COO, Priorities, Setting Goals

Setting a clear vision for an organization is perhaps the most important task for a CEO. Sharing and instilling the vision throughout the organization is perhaps the most important task for a COO. A clear vision that is understood by everyone in the organization and continually reinforced by the leaders will provide an intangible force that seems to be driving the company. Read more…

Getting Started – Learning to Let Go

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in COO, Foundation, Getting Started

There is a big difference between being a CEO and a COO.  I know, because I’ve been both.

At my first startup company I didn’t have a COO and, while the company was a success, it wasn’t until I learned to let go of certain tasks that the company flourished.  Entrepreneurs, almost by definition have a vision of how things should be and how their company should be run, but first time entrepreneurs, myself included, often spend too much time on internal details which can be crippling to a startup venture.
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Getting Started – Setting Priorities

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in COO, Foundation, Getting Started, Priorities

My first job out of college was a corporate engineering position with a $3B multinational aluminum and chemical corporation.* My branch of engineering was highly specialized so, as a 22 year old, I was able to pick and chose which of several dozen multi-million dollar projects I wanted to work on at any of the company’s manufacturing facilities worldwide.  My list of projects was a mile long with some involving serious health and safety concerns of employees.  Every project required reconciling the production and financial needs of plant managers with the demands of corporate execs to maintain control over disparate operations.  For a foot loose young man with an unlimited travel budget, I needed to balance my responsibilities with a desire to see the world.

You see, if you’re 22 years old and can choose between working in a can factory supplying a major European brewery with access to all the beer you can drink for free, or standing next to an 1,100 degree extrusion furnace on a 107 degree July day in the panhandle of Texas which would you choose?

Well… not so fast.
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